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Rudolph Valentino

Rudolph Valentino was a dancer and Hollywood superstar. He is famous for a scene in the 1921 movie “The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse” where he dances the tango with Beatrice Dominguez.

Rodolfo Alfonso Raffaello Pierre Filibert Guglielmi di Valentina d’Antonguella was born in 1895 in Castellaneta, Italy, of a French mother and Italian father. In 1913 he traveled to the United States in search of new opportunities and this is where he learned to dance the tango, possibly with Casimiro Aín.

These were the years when tangomania was taking over New York. Valentino worked as a taxi dancer in restaurants such as Maxim’s Restaurant-Cabaret where dancing tea parties were held in the British fashion. In 1917 he was entangled in a scandal with a married woman which led him to leave the city. This is how he began traveling and working with theatrical companies which took him to the west coast.

After traveling for a few months Valentino settled in Los Angeles where he worked as a dance teacher. He began looking for work as an actor and landed his first major role playing Julio Desnoyers in the silent movie “The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse”, the 1921 movie where we can see him performing the tango in his gaucho attire. [2]

Valentino’s good looks and seductive attitude on the dance floor made a strong impression on the american public and quickly turned him into a superstar. [1] The popularity of “The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse” and the so called “latin lover” was such that men were seen wearing gel in their hair and young people were suddenly interested in learning to dance the tango.

With his wife Natacha Rambova, Valentino toured the country to perform the exotic dance in his own particular style. He also pursued his career as a Hollywood actor and was starred in fourteen films including The Sheik, Blood and Sand, The Eagle, and The Son of the Sheik before he died in 1926 following a surgery. He was only 31-year-old.  π

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[1] GROPPA, Carlos G. The tango in the United states. Jefferson: McFarland & Company Inc. 2004. Print.

[2] QUIN, Eleanor. The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse (1921). Turner Classic Movies. Online. 

Adios nonino (1959)

“Adios Nonino” is a tango composed by Astor Piazzolla in 1959 as a response to the sudden death of his father, Vicente Piazzolla.

Astor Piazzolla was performing in Puerto Rico with Juan Carlos Copes and Maria Nieves when his father died in an accident in Mar del Plata. This event came at a difficult time of his life when he was struggling to hold onto his musical career, putting aside his own style and vision of tango and performing for money to sustain his family.

When Piazzolla came home after his tour in Puerto Rico he asked be left alone. According to his son, he locked himself up into a room and came out with Adios Nonino. Piazzolla himself says he composed it in one hour and left all the memories he had of his father in that one piece.

Piazzolla had already written a piece called Nonino in 1954, also in honor of his father. The two of them had been very close. Vicente Piazzolla transmitted his love of tango to his son and bought him his first bandoneon in New York when he was only 9 years-old.

Adiós Nonino is perhaps the best and most famous composition of Astor Piazzollaπ

Astor Piazzolla

Astor Piazzolla was a composer and bandoneon player of the vanguardia. He is famous for incorporating elements of classical music and jazz into Argentine tango and creating a new distinct style called tango nuevo.

Piazzola was born in 1921 in Mar del Plata but he grew up in New York City where his family moved when he was 3 years-old. His father loved tango music and one day he found a small bandoneon in a shop and bought it for him; this is how Piazzolla began playing the bandoneon when he was only 9 years-old.

When Carlos Gardel came to New York City in 1934 he could hardly speak English and Piazzolla became his little friend and interpreter. This is how he ended up playing a small role as a boy in the movie “El dia que me quieras”. Gardel invited Piazzolla to join him on his tour but Piazzolla’s father refused as Piazzola was still very young. Gardel and his entourage died in a plane crash in Columbia one year later.

In 1936 the family returned to Argentina and Piazzolla began playing in traditional tango orchestras in Buenos Aires. He worked with Anibal Troilo for 5 years and with Francisco Fiorentino for two weeks before he formed his own orchestra in 1946 and began composing for movies.

In the early 1950’s Piazzolla decided to distance himself from tango and he went to Paris to study classical music at the Fontainbleau conservatory where he found his true identity as a musician. Back in Buenos Aires, he formed his controversial Octeto Buenos Aires, adding a cello and electric guitar to the traditional orquesta típica.

Piazzolla continued composing and developing his style throughout the 70’s and 80’s in spite of financial difficulties and strong criticism against his work. He is now known as one of the most important musicians of the history of Argentina.

Piazzolla died in 1992 shortly after dictating his memoirs to Natalio Gorin. π

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[1] Gorin, Natalio. Astor Piazzolla: A Memoir. Alba Editoral, 2003. Print.

Guardia nueva

The period of tango history called guardia nueva goes approximately from 1925 to 1955 and can be divided into two phases; a first phase of restructuring (transformación, 1925-1940), followed by a peak in creativity and popularity of tango commonly referred to as the golden age of tango (Exaltación 1940-1955).

The first sign of a transition can be traced back to 1917 with the recording of the first tango canciónMi noche triste. By establishing a new standard for tango poetry, Pascual Contursi and Carlos Gardel opened a whole new chapter of tango history. However it would take some years for tango music to begin its own renovation process with Julio de Caro and the introduction of the compass of 8/4. De Caro formed his first sexteto in 1924, one year before Carlos Gadel began his solo career, and this is where the transition is completed to the gardia nueva.

Another important figure of the guardia nueva is Juan d’Arienzo whose strong beat and energetic style appealed to the youth of the 1930’s. By engaging a new generation of dancers and putting tango back in fashion, D’Arienzo gave a second life to tango, opening the way to the golden age of the 1940’s.

During the exaltación phase, tango dance and music both reached a peak in terms of popularity and refinement. Different styles emerged from the work of innovative directors such as Anibal Troilo, Carlos Di Sarli, Rodolfo Biagi and Osvaldo Pugliese. Tango was everywhere during the golden age, not only in dance halls but also in movies, radio programs, carnivals, theaters, streets and homes.

The golden age of tango came to an end around 1955 as rock and roll became the music of the youth. After that point tango continued to evolve into the vanguardia but it was no longer the mainstream phenomenon it once was.  π

Orquesta típica Victor

The Orquesta Típica Victor, also known as OTV, was a label orchestra created in 1925 by Victor for promotional purpose. It was composed of a selection of musicians and signers which were affiliated to the record company as a part of other major orchestras.

Each recording sessions brought together a different selection of artists which are often impossible to identify on specific recordings. Yet the orchestra maintained a consistent sound for over 20 years.

The cohesion of the orchestra was ensured by directors Adolfo Carabelli (1925-1936), Federico Scorticati (1936-1943) and Mario Maurano (1943-1944). Some of the most famous musicians who performed for OTV include Pedro Laurenz, Elvino Vardaro and Anibal Troilo. And signers who recorded with OTV include Roberto Diaz, Juan Carlos Delson, Ernesto Fama, Jaimes Moreno and Carlos Lafuente. [2]

As a label orchestras, OTV never performed in public. It left over 444 recordings, still known today for their quality and excellence of interpretation.

The Orquesta Típica Victor is only one of many orchestras assembled by the label Victor for promotional purposes. The others are La Orquesta Victor Popular, La Orquesta Típica los Provincianos, La Orquesta Radio Victor Argentina, La Orquesta Argentina Victor, La Orquesta Victor Internacional, el Cuarteto Victor and the Trio Victorπ

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[1] Pinson, Nestor. “Orquesta Tipica Victor”. Todotango. Web. Sept 2016.

[2] El tango: Un siglo de Historia. Buenos Aires: Editorial Perfil, 1992. Print.

 

Bandoneon

The bandoneon is a musical instrument of the family of the concertina which was created in Germany around 1845 as an alternative to the organ for religious services. It is not clear who first invented the bandoneon but it is has been attributed to Carl Zimmermann who sold his manufacture to Ernest Louis Arnold, manufacturer of ELA bandoneons. Ernest Louis Arnold was the father of Alfredo Arnold who later produced the bandoneon “doble A” which are highly praised by tango musicians.

It is not clear exactly when the bandoneon arrived in Argentina. The first documented mention of a bandoneon being played in the Rio de la Plata is from a newspaper article by Jorge Labraña from 1895. According to this article the instrument was brought to Uruguay by a Suiss immigrant in 1863. Other sources indicate that it was imported by an Englishman, Don Tomas, who came to Argentina in 1884. [1]

One of the first musicians to incorporate the bandoneon into tango is Domingo Santa Cruz, a musician who used to perform in the cafes of La Boca and Barracas in the early 1900’s. Other bandoneonistas of the first generation include Genaro Esposito, Vicente Loduca, Eduardo Arolas, Vicente Greco and Juan Maglio.

The inclusion of the bandoneon into tango bands during the first decade of the 20th century had profound repercussions on the music. Considering that these bands were mostly composed of guitars, flutes and violins, the adition of a bandoneon brought deeper tones and a slower pace of execution. It eventually replaced flutes and became a essential component of the orquesta tipica. [2]

Since the original manufactures in Germany have been closed for over 70 year, bandoneons are now rare and expensive instruments. [3] Artisanal bandoneons have been built lately but the process is long and complex and remains expensive.

The first bandoneon made in Argentina was released in 2000. The bandoneon AZ was built by Argentine luthier Angel Zullo and presented to the public on the day tango was officially declared world heritage by the UNESCO. [4]

It is said that bandoneons were built to last 200 years with proper maintenance.  π

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[1] Zucchi, Oscar. El tango, el bandoneón y sus interpretes. Buenos Aires: Corregidor, 1998. Print.

[2] Pesce, Ruben, Oscar del Priore, and Silvestre Byron. La Historia del Tango: La Guardia Vieja. Buenos Aires: Corregidor, 1977. Print.

[3] “Salvar el bandoneón”. La Nación. Web. June 26, 2009. Online. https://www.lanacion.com.ar/1143843-salvar-el-bandoneon

[4] “Empezó a sonar el primer bandoneón nacional” La Nación. Web. Oct 3, 2009. Online. https://www.lanacion.com.ar/1181690-empezo-a-sonar-el-primer-bandoneon-nacional 

Evaristo Carriego

Evaristo Carriego was a poet of minor importance of the early 1900’s. His name became associated to the origins of tango through the work of Jorge Luis Borges who saw in him the inventor of a style of urban poetry which is at the root of tango.  Though Carriego was never a famous author nor a man of tango, his name today has a tremendous power to evoke the spirit of the city, the mythical neighborhoods of Buenos Aires and the essence of tango itself.

Evaristo Francisco Estanislao Carriego was born in the province of Entre Rios in 1883. When he was four-years-old his family moved to Buenos Aires, to the house on Honduras street where Evaristo grew up and lived until his death in 1912.

This neighbourhood where Carriego spent his life, late 19th centruy Palermo with all it’s roughness, home of poor uprooted immigrants, cuchilleros and compadritos, bajofondo and birthplace of tango, this is the universe in which Carriego lived, loved and found poetry.

Little is know about his life besides what Borges wrote about him. [1] Borges knew Carriego personally in his youth as a neighbor and a friend of the family. [3] His father used to hang out with the poet and Borges was strongly impressed by his presence and deeply touched by his depictions of the Buenos Aires he knew if his childhood.

According to Borges, Carriego used to hang out in literary cafes. Very sentimental and introvert. lived of simple thing everyday nothing fancy and was the first to discover the poetic potential of. Themewich remained present in tango.

 discover the beauty and poetry in rough neighbourhood of Buenos Aires at the turn of the 20th century. His poetry was born of the simple reality of life in a fast growing city. just like the tango it is a testimony of the genesis of Buenos Aires and opened the way to style of poetry and themes which would become constant in tango from Angel Villoldo to Homero Manzi and Horacio Ferrer. Everyday like in the rough neighbourhood, the malevos, cuchilleros and compadritos, the organito and of course, women.

Carriego died of tuberculosis in 1912, at age 29, leaving one published book Misas herejesEl alma del suburbio and La canción del barrio  which contained poetry he is known for today were published after his death.

The house where he lived on Honduras street was bought by the city of Buenos Aires in 1977 to host a museum and library. La Bibliotheca Evaristo Carriego was opened to the public in 1981 and became home to over 5 500 documents in print and electronic formats including various collections of poetry. It closed in 2013 for renovations and unfortunately remains closed to this day. [2]

Other tributes to this mythical character of tango history include a piece by Astor Piazzolla entitled “Milonga Carrieguera” and a tango by Eduardo Ravira, “A Evaristo Carriego”, recorded by Pugliese in 1969. There is a street in Palermo named after him. π

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[1] Borges, Jorge Luis. Evaristo Carriego. Buenos Aires. Emece, 1989. Print.

[2] Ordenan reconstruir la casa donde vivio Evaristo Carriego. La Nacion, March 27, 2014. Online. http://www.lanacion.com.ar/1675640-ordenan-reconstruir-la-casa-donde-vivio-evaristo-carriego 

[3] Borges, Jorge Luis. El tango: cuatro conferencias. Buenos Aires. Sudamericana, 2016. Print.

[4] Domingo, Luis Hernández. Frontera, llanura, patria: Un otro Borges. Anales de la Literatura Hispanoamericana, 1999. 28: 731-744. Online.  https://dialnet.unirioja.es/servlet/articulo?codigo=52363